Answers to 9 questions about me that I wasn’t asked on a recent podcast.

Last week I was a guest on 2 podcasts. Both hosts were great and I expect the shows will be worthwhile listens when they come out in the next month. One of the hosts sent me a list of pre-questions to consider. Because I like to be prepared, I wrote out brief answers to the questions. But once the interview began we quickly found different topics to pursuit. Since I already had the answers ready I am sharing them here for a little more insight about me, my career and the 7 books I dig.

  1. How did you get started with your product/service/area of expertise? 

I studied journalism and psychology at the University of Wisconsin and wanted to become an advertising copywriter. A college professor of mine, Roger Rathke, introduced me to his college buddy Paul Counsel, who was the CEO of the advertising agency, Cramer Krasselt. I asked for an informational interview. I borrowed a suit from my college track teammate, now the Honorable Judge Greg Gill. The interview lasted 5 hours. Including an adventure to Paul’s house to meet his mudjacker. (Who goes to the CEO’s house on their interview? This kid!) A month later I finally sent a thank you note. And in response, they offered me a job. It was like the end of Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory when Charlie hands back the little covid-looking candy and wins the chocolate factory. Make sure to always send a thank you note.

2. Why were you drawn to this area of expertise? 

I am just wired for it. In college, after a couple of rough semesters, I mapped out my natural talents and how I could get paid to put them to work. The work of an advertising creative seemed to fall right at the intersection of my talent and sought-after skills.

3. Which hurdles did you personally face, and how did you overcome them?  

Generally speaking, none. I really haven’t had any major hurdles in my career other than the garden variety, like figuring out when and where my next chances for growth and promotion were. Maybe I was too unfiltered at the beginning of my career. I also developed a sweet tea addiction, which almost made me too wonderful for a while. Today I try to keep that between the ditches.

4. What do you think your unique skillset or superpower is that has helped you become successful? 

There are probably 4 things that have helped create my career success:

  1. My abundant enthusiasm. I can get excited about anything. Clients appreciate that.
  2. My ability to make and keep friends.
  3. My ability to think strategically
  4. The creative way my brain works. I make connections that others don’t. It glitches in a good way.

5. Are there any tools or books that have really helped you on your journey? 

Yes! I read a lot. Here are a few books that profoundly influenced me.

  1. The E-Myth
  2. Call Me Ted
  3. Rich Dad Poor Dad,
  4. Think And Grow Rich.
  5. 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
  6. The Alchemist.
  7. The Little Engine That Could

6. What advice would you give someone wanting to pursue a career similar to yours? 

  1. Build and maintain your friendships, relationships, and network.
  2. Continue to self educate.
  3. Live an interesting life. It fuels your creativity.

7. What’s one thing you wish you had known when you began your career? 

How valuable my skills really were.

8. Who are the three people who have been the most influential to you? 

  1. My parents Bob and Jill Albrecht molded the clay. They worked as one unit. So I count them together.
  2. Roger Rathke: My College Professor. He taught me all the basics of advertising strategy and creativity. I was well prepared for the real world of advertising when I graduated.
  3. Paul Counsell: Former CEO of Cramer Krasselt, who gave me my start in advertising. He is a great people person. I liked him the instant I met him. And I loved being part of his team.
  4. Dan Richards: One of my closest friends since middle school. And the first of my friends to become an entrepreneur. I was very close to Dan as he began his entrepreneurial journey. And Dan was also my first client when I launched The Weaponry.
  5. My high school track coach Jude Dutille, and my college track coach Mark Napier.  They helped me focus and develop my limited natural talent into meaningful results. What they taught me about competition and continuous self-improvement I have applied to the rest of my life and my career.

9. What is your best tip for someone struggling to take their idea forward?

Sharpen the idea until it is very clear and easy to understand. Then talk to the people you are making the idea for. See if your idea meets an unmet need. If not adjust it.

Key Takeaway

Always show up prepared. And if you don’t use everything you prepared for a podcast, you can turn it into a blog post.

This is how many people I hope to reach with each blog post.

When I first started writing this blog 5 years ago I thought a lot about the growth of the blog. I focused on how many subscribers I was getting. I thought about how many people liked, commented on, and shared my posts. But over time, as I should care more and more about such things, I find myself caring less and less.

It’s not because I don’t think growth and significance are important. It’s because I have thought more about the power we all have to add real value to just one person.

A Critical Post

Back in 2015, as I was preparing to launch my advertising and idea agency, The Weaponry, I read a blog post that unlocked a critical door for me. It was written by my friend Christien Louviere. Christien is an entrepreneur in Atlanta. And he wrote a blog post about the top 10 things you don’t need to do to start your own business.

In the post he conveys that it is a lot easier to start a business than you thought. He encourages readers not to worry about the many things they likely thought were speed bumps, or impediments to entrepreneurship.

It was a very useful post. And it contradicted Johnny Paycheck’s take-this-job-and- shove-it philosophy. In fact, one of the 10 points was that you don’t need to quit your job to start your own business. In fact, he encouraged readers NOT to quit their day jobs until they absolutely have to. Instead, start your new business on the side (either side will do), and let your day job fund the night job, or side hustle, as long as you can.

The Entrepreneurial Track Change

When I read that post I already had potential clients encouraging me to start my own business. Which I was excited to do. The problem I couldn’t figure out was how and when to switch from salaried employee to on-my-own entrepreneur, like Patti Labelle. At that point, I was 42, making the highest salary I had ever made. I had a significant mortgage. I had 3 kids, and a wife I really wanted to keep.

Good Advice

The advice to get going while still holding onto my job was exactly what I needed to hear, when I needed to hear it. It unlocked a critical door for me to pass through. (And I have found that passing through is far better than passing out or passing on.)

But the funny thing is that I bet not that many people read Christien’s blog post. Christien wasn’t the French Seth Godin. He didn’t have millions of followers. For all I know I was the only person who read that post.

But Christien had knowledge and insights that I needed. And he shared it, like Sonny Bono. With that one post, I found exactly what I was looking for, unlike U2. I don’t know how things would have unfolded for me given other timing and circumstances. Because so much of life’s success is about getting the timing right. #TWSS

A Better Measure

I no longer concern myself with how many people read my blog. I am not trying to impact or influence the masses like a televangelist. I don’t expect to ever get paid for my blogging. Or be considered an important influencer.

Instead, what I think about is sharing what I know, what I have learned and what I have experienced. I think about sharing my accumulated knowledge on entrepreneurship, creativity, advertising, marketing, networking, positivity, wellbeing, and adventuring.

I expect that what I share will be valuable to one person who reads it. And that’s all that matters to me. I don’t even worry about whether or not they tell me that something I wrote was impactful to them. I trust that there is a person meant to read each post I share. And that it will help them in an important way. Even if it is just getting through a challenging day.

Proper Perspective

At the end of our days, the only thing that really matters is the impact we had on each other. If I can share something I have learned, and have a positive impact on another human, then my effort is well rewarded.

Key Takeaway

If you have a blog, vlog, podcast, newsletter, twitter feed, Pinterest board or Instagram account where you are sharing what you know, what you think, or what you enjoy, don’t be discouraged by a small following. Focus on adding value. If one person benefits from what you are creating you are positively impacting a life. That is our highest calling. Thank you for answering. And keep sharing. Someone is listening. And that someone is everything.

*If you know someone who could benefit from this message, please share it with them.

Want more tips on blogging? I think you’ll like these:

What I have learned about blogging after 200 posts.

12 things I’ve learned from writing 300 blog posts.

One day I started a blog. Now I have published 500 posts.

One day I started a blog. Now I have published 500 posts.

When I first heard about blogging I loved the concept. Thanks to the internet, suddenly you could write and publish your thoughts as often as you wanted, without having to own your own newspaper, magazine, or bathroom stall.

I knew this was a great platform for me. Because I could fill my writings with silly comments and there would be no editor to edit them out. Then again, there would be no editor to catch my spellng mstaks. And I have a type-O personality.

Over the following decade I took several good swings at blogging. I now have 9 random blogs to my credit. But to 7 of them I’m just the Bloggy-Daddy. You know, the guy who created that poor little abandoned blog and, like Tom Petty, don’t come around here no more.

Sailing The Entrepreneurship

In the fall of 2015 I began plans to launch my own advertising agency. I loved the idea of sharing my experience with the world through a blog. I figured the creative inspiration would be endless. So I began writing The Perfect Agency Project blog. I applied the same proven success formula to both my business and my blog. Which is to say I started and never stopped. #DontStopGetItGetIt

The Weaponry

Today, my advertising and idea agency, The Weaponry, is set to have our best year ever. Which is amazing considering that 2020 the year is nothing like 2020 the TV show.

What began in my home office in Atlanta now has offices in Milwaukee and Columbus. We have clients in Atlanta, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Dallas, Raleigh, Philadelphia, Manchester, New Hampshire, Columbus, Cincinnati, Madison, Milwaukee and more.

The Blog

This blog that began my entrepreneurial journey with me is stronger than ever too. Because I just keep writing. However, back in March, just before the world went sideways with Covid-19, I changed the name of this blog from The Perfect Agency Project to the Adam Albrecht Blog.

I made the change for two reasons. First, because I wanted to have greater latitude to write about my learnings, experiences and observations beyond entrepreneurship. Because entrepreneurship teaches you lessons that reach far beyond business.

Second, I wanted the blog to be easier to find. Now, anyone typing my name into a search engine will easily find this blog. Today, I am also working on a book. And connecting your name to your blog creates better connectivity to all of your writing. And some of your wronging.

Mr. 500

The post that you are reading right now is my 500th post on the Adam Albrecht blog. I have shared a considerable collections of experiences, ideas, learnings and observations since the fall of 2015.

What I have enjoyed most is that the process of writing this blog forces me to think. It makes me think about what I am learning and experiencing. It makes me think about my life and career and the journey I am on. Which means that life isn’t simply passing me by. I’m evaluating it, studying it and appreciating it every day. And like a tech-enabled Elvis Costello, every day I write the blog.

Thank You!

Thank you for reading this blog. I know your time is valuable. The fact that you have spent some of your time reading my blog means a lot to me. I appreciate your support, comments, likes and shares. I appreciate it when you challenge my thinking. I appreciate it when you find a spelling mistake for me. And I appreciate it when you let me know that you picked up on the obscure reference I dropped in the story.

Key Takeaway

The key to success is simply starting and never stopping. If you do those 2 things, you can build a business from dust. You can write 500 blog posts. And you can do anything else you set your mind to. Far too many people come to the end of their days and regret the things they didn’t do. Don’t let that be you. Start today. And just keep going.

*If you know someone who would benefit from this message, please share it with them.