One day I started a blog. Now I have published 500 posts.

When I first heard about blogging I loved the concept. Thanks to the internet, suddenly you could write and publish your thoughts as often as you wanted, without having to own your own newspaper, magazine, or bathroom stall.

I knew this was a great platform for me. Because I could fill my writings with silly comments and there would be no editor to edit them out. Then again, there would be no editor to catch my spellng mstaks. And I have a type-O personality.

Over the following decade I took several good swings at blogging. I now have 9 random blogs to my credit. But to 7 of them I’m just the Bloggy-Daddy. You know, the guy who created that poor little abandoned blog and, like Tom Petty, don’t come around here no more.

Sailing The Entrepreneurship

In the fall of 2015 I began plans to launch my own advertising agency. I loved the idea of sharing my experience with the world through a blog. I figured the creative inspiration would be endless. So I began writing The Perfect Agency Project blog. I applied the same proven success formula to both my business and my blog. Which is to say I started and never stopped. #DontStopGetItGetIt

The Weaponry

Today, my advertising and idea agency, The Weaponry, is set to have our best year ever. Which is amazing considering that 2020 the year is nothing like 2020 the TV show.

What began in my home office in Atlanta now has offices in Milwaukee and Columbus. We have clients in Atlanta, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Dallas, Raleigh, Philadelphia, Manchester, New Hampshire, Columbus, Cincinnati, Madison, Milwaukee and more.

The Blog

This blog that began my entrepreneurial journey with me is stronger than ever too. Because I just keep writing. However, back in March, just before the world went sideways with Covid-19, I changed the name of this blog from The Perfect Agency Project to the Adam Albrecht Blog.

I made the change for two reasons. First, because I wanted to have greater latitude to write about my learnings, experiences and observations beyond entrepreneurship. Because entrepreneurship teaches you lessons that reach far beyond business.

Second, I wanted the blog to be easier to find. Now, anyone typing my name into a search engine will easily find this blog. Today, I am also working on a book. And connecting your name to your blog creates better connectivity to all of your writing. And some of your wronging.

Mr. 500

The post that you are reading right now is my 500th post on the Adam Albrecht blog. I have shared a considerable collections of experiences, ideas, learnings and observations since the fall of 2015.

What I have enjoyed most is that the process of writing this blog forces me to think. It makes me think about what I am learning and experiencing. It makes me think about my life and career and the journey I am on. Which means that life isn’t simply passing me by. I’m evaluating it, studying it and appreciating it every day. And like a tech-enabled Elvis Costello, every day I write the blog.

Thank You!

Thank you for reading this blog. I know your time is valuable. The fact that you have spent some of your time reading my blog means a lot to me. I appreciate your support, comments, likes and shares. I appreciate it when you challenge my thinking. I appreciate it when you find a spelling mistake for me. And I appreciate it when you let me know that you picked up on the obscure reference I dropped in the story.

Key Takeaway

The key to success is simply starting and never stopping. If you do those 2 things, you can build a business from dust. You can write 500 blog posts. And you can do anything else you set your mind to. Far too many people come to the end of their days and regret the things they didn’t do. Don’t let that be you. Start today. And just keep going.

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Never be afraid to ask for what you want.

Last summer my family traveled to the Pacific Northwest for our summer vacation. There was so much we wanted to see that mapping out our route and scheduling our stops over 9 days was a major challenge. Especially because we wanted to visit British Columbia. Which I would have named Canadian Columbia, but what do I know?

Train Spotting

The thing my son Johann wanted to see most on the trip was the Oregon Rail Heritage Museum in Portland. However, the museum’s schedule was a problem. It was only open Thursday through Sunday. And when the logistics were set, we would be in Portland on a Tuesday. #bummer

However, the museum was across the street from another site we planned to hit: the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. So my wife, Dawn, told Johann that we would drive by the train museum and see whatever we could see from the outside.

On The Outside Looking In

As we approached the train museum we indeed saw a few trains and train cars outside. Which was nice. But the reason Johann was so interested in this museum is that it held one of his all-time favorite trains. The magnificent Daylight 4449. The only remaining train of its type. The Daylight was inside the museum, and could not be seen from the outside. #Boo

Come on Clark, It Will Be Fun.

Dawn suggested that we park the car at the closed museum parking lot anyway, and take a look at the closed facility. So we did. In the process we encountered several signs reminding us that the museum was closed that day. I felt a little silly getting out of the car there. Like Clark Griswold parking at an obviously-closed Wally World.

A Sign Of Life

We got out of the car and walked to the fence surrounding the museum grounds. Then Dawn spotted two people exiting the closed building. They clearly looked like they worked at the Museum. Dawn walked briskly along the fence to the gate they were headed for. I knew she was in Deion Sanders-mode, and was trying to intercept them.

I cringed at the idea of what Dawn was going to say to these people. She’s aggressive. A trait that seems more in sync with her years living in New York City and Chicago than her childhood years in Wausau, Wisconsin.

The Talk

I kept my distance as I watched Dawn intercept the man and woman at the gate. I could hear her sweetly explain that we had come all the way from Wisconsin, and that our son Johann would really, really love to see the Daylight 4449. I braced for the employees to remind her that the museum was closed. And that the sign out front should have told her that.

Instead, the man and woman both smiled at her story. Then, suddenly, the man unlocked the gate, and invited us in. Moments later we were standing inside the large museum staring at the grand prize. The Daylight 4449.

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Johann finally got to lay his eyes on the prize, thanks to his Mama.

However, since the museum was closed, we didn’t get the normal view of the train. Instead, the wonderful people of the museum gave us an all-access pass to every part of the train, with the engineer as our personal tour guide. Our entire family got to climb up in the cab, past the Please Keep Off signs, which was my favorite part.

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Breaking the law, breaking the law…

Johann got stories and insights that most people would have never heard. We felt like distinguished guests and VIPs at the train museum. It was a very special experience. And all for one simple reason: Dawn asked if we could come inside.

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Albrecht aboard!

The Lesson

That experience provided our family with an important life lesson. It taught us all that if you want something you have to put yourself in a position to get it. You have to be willing to ask for what you want, and not be afraid to get a ‘No‘. It taught us that a closed door will sometimes open for you if you ask. And it taught us that some of the best experiences are on the other side of a locked door.

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The Crew.

Key Takeaway

Often times a closed door will open when you show just how much you want to come inside. It pays to be earnest and honest about how much it means to you. Remember, someone holds the keys to unlock every locked door. Find that person, and ask to come in. The worst thing that can happen is you are told no. In which case you are no worse off than you were before. But if they say yes, it could open the doors to incredible new experiences and possibilities.

Today, there are many people facing real health and financial challenges. If you need help, or access, don’t be afraid to ask. It’s the quickest and most effective way to get what you want.

*If you know someone who could benefit from this message, please share it with them.

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Look at that happy kid…

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Thanks to everyone at the Oregon Rail Heritage Museum for such an incredible experience. 

Every day I write the blog. And more people read it.

It’s really easy to start your own blog. I should know. I have started at least 8 of them. But it’s really hard to keep them going. I should know. Because 7 of mine moved like glaciers, until global warming put them out of their misery.

I enjoyed writing the blogs. But I never created a habit that kept them going. It takes time to find your groove, your voice and your writing schedule. Even more challenging, it takes a lot to attract an audience that wants to read what you are writing.

Writing No Matter Whataburger

When I started this blog I made a commitment to myself to just keep at it, no matter what. I was committed to sharing my experience as I launched my own advertising agency from dust. I thought it would help others start their own businesses. Just as I had read other blogs that inspired my entrepreneurial adventure. If the business failed and no one read the blog, at least when it ended I would have the experience and learnings well documented for myself. Which is like seeing the light at the end of my carpal tunnel.

My Twins

In many ways The Perfect Agency Project blog and The Weaponry, my advertising and idea agency, are like twins. They were born at the same time. They have grown together. And they are inseparable. Like conjoined twins. Or regular twins who got into the Gorilla Glue.

Quiet Growth

The growth of The Weaponry has been a shared experience, as we have added team members and clients. But the growth of The Perfect Agency Project blog has been private and quiet.

Writing this blog is a solitary endeavor. It’s just me and my computer. I write down my thoughts, lessons, experiences, observations and insights that stem from working in and on my business. Then I hope that someone, somewhere will read the posts and find some value in them.

Sometimes the posts are well read. And sometimes they are not. It is hard to tell why some posts fly and some flop. Especially when what I consider to be the best, most important ideas gain very little traction.

Write Anyway

But whether a post was extremely popular or went mostly unnoticed, I write again the next day. I have been consistent and persistent. I just kept writing. And just kept posting.

Seeing Obvious Progress

I am proud to say that on September 17th, 2019, the total number of views and visitors to my blog for 2019 surpassed the total number of views and visitors the blog received in all of 2018.  Which means that it had the same number of visitors in 8.5 months in 2019 as it did in the 12 months of 2018. #FirstGradeMathYall

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This is the growth chart for my blog. It represents the views and visitors (dark and light shades) for each year since 2015. The pink at the top of 2019 is optimism.

Insistence on Persistence

The persistence is leading to progress. I still have 3.5 months of readership growth ahead this year. At the pace of 3 posts per week, that is 42 blog posts left to share in 2019. As a result, I expect a 50% growth in views and visitors for the year. Which for a blog I have been writing for 4 years feels pretty good.

Fun Fact: The Perfect Agency Project blog has been read in 113 countries around the world in 2019.

I attribute the growth to just keeping at it. Slow and steady. Each post, whether it is read by tens or thousands, contributes to that total. And that’s progress. Truly, every little bit helps.

Key Takeaway

Success doesn’t come overnight. It comes in small steps that seem insignificant on their own. But over time the cumulative effect of all those small steps is significant progress. So keep going. Commit to creating a habit of action, day after day. Then give yourself time. Time for the results to pile up and make a difference. If I can do it you can do it. Do a little every day. And just don’t stop.

*If you know someone who could benefit from this message, please share it with them.